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16 janvier 2007 2 16 /01 /janvier /2007 08:01
  • Jacques Chardonne (16/01/2007 catégorie: HERITAGE HISTOIRE EUROPE)
    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Chardonne   http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Chardonne   http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Chardonne http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Chardonne   * ...
  • Vidéo : course de cochons vs mosquée (15/01/2007 catégorie: RELIGIONS .MORALE .)
    Pig Race vs Mosque   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg_qctXR8jc# ...
  • Station de ski sans neige (15/01/2007 catégorie: ENVIRONNEMENT)
    Chômage dans les stations de ski... Publié le 15/01 à 11:20 ...
  • Roger NIMIER (15/01/2007 catégorie: HERITAGE HISTOIRE EUROPE)
      .. http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Nimier   http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Nimier http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Nimier * ...
  • Paul MORAND (15/01/2007 catégorie: HERITAGE HISTOIRE EUROPE)
      . http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Morand ...
  • Saddam : Jugement (11/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)
    Mardi 09 Janvier 2007 blog drzz Par Guy Sorman, http://www.hebdo.ch/sormanblog.cfm La condamnation de Saddam Hussein par un tribunal arabe a été un événement historique considérable, un tournant peut-être, non pas seulement pour l’Irak mais dans le monde arabo-musulman.  Certes, ...
  • Europ , promised land for Africans (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
                  EUROPE THE 'PROMISED LAND' FOR AFRICANShttp://allafrica.com/stories/200701040880.htmlThe last summer has seen a surge in immigration to mainland Europe form some African countries. While European leaders are attempting to stop the wave, Tope Akinwande points to the hypocrisy ...
  • Europe " terre promise " pour africains (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
          EUROPE THE 'PROMISED LAND' FOR AFRICANShttp://allafrica.com/stories/200701040880.htmlThe last summer has seen a surge in immigration to mainland Europe form some African countries. While European leaders are attempting to stop the wave, Tope Akinwande points to the hypocrisy of massive farm subsidies received ...
  • UK Gov't smuggled aliens stay (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
          GOV'T LETS SMUGGLED ALIENS STAY IN BRITAIN  le GOUVERNEMENT BRITANNIQUE LAISSE LES CLANDESTINS ILLEGAUX RESTER DANS LE PAYS .http://www.yorkshiretoday.co.uk/ViewArticle2.aspx?SectionID=55&ArticleID=1955424The Government must sign a European Convention which grants victims of human trafficking the ...
  • Finland to repatriating asylum seekers (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
           FINLAND STARTS REPATRIATING ASYLUM SEEKERS .http://www.hs.fi/english/article/Finland+to+start+repatriating+people+to+Afghanistan+and+possibly+Iraq/1135224073410        FINLAND STARTS REPATRIATING ASYLUM SEEKERShttp://www.hs.fi/english/article/Finland+to+start+repatriating+people+to+Afghanistan+and+possibly+Iraq/1135224073410The ...
  • Beginning of Bulgarian arrivals in UK (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
          2007   First coachload of Bulgarians arrivehttp://www.lse.co.uk/ShowStory.asp?story=OM432660G&news_headline=first_coachload_of_bulgarians_arriveThe first bus-load of Bulgarians heading to Britain for work arrived in London this morning and spoke of their joy at being in the country.The 50 on board ...
  • Indians sue UK Gov't (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
                       INDIANS SUE BRITISH GOV’T TO STAY IN BRITAIN  des INDIENS POURSUIVENT EN JUSTICE LE GOUVERNEMENT BRITANNIQUE POUR DEMEURER EN UK . Some Indians were admitted to this country under rules that were later changed, and they ...
  • Britain , immigration massive wave (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
        BRITAIN STRUGGLES TO COPE WITH IMMIGRATION WAVEhttp://worldpoliticswatch.com/article.aspx?id=451Manchester, England -- In this gritty northern city once famous for its textile exports, two bus companies have had their operating licenses suspended for employing Polish drivers who cannot read English road signs. In the Romanian ...
  • Home-building Cancellations (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
    Cancellations hit home-builder orders D.R. Horton, Meritage sales hurt by nervous buyers backing out of contracts   Print E-mail Disable live quotes RSS Digg it Del.icio.us By John Spence, MarketWatch Last Update: 1:16 PM ET Jan 9, 2007    http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/home-builders-say-orders-hurt/story.aspx?guid={531BB129-92AB-4A1C-A04F-292D93CD276F}&siteid=myyahoo&dist=myyahoo BOSTON ...
  • Québec 2007 récession ? (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
    5 décembre 2006 Une récession en 2007? Le gouvernement du Québec aurait sans doute eu avantage à annoncer son investissement de 1,2 milliard de dollars dans la recherche et l’innovation avant cette semaine. Le Québec doit composer avec un ralentissement économique, et son faible taux de ...
  • Xmas Day Muslim presenter unmasked (11/01/2007 catégorie: RELIGIONS .MORALE .)
    30th December 2006News article filed by BNP news team     ...
  • Farewell to a broadcasting Legend (11/01/2007 catégorie: RELIGIONS .MORALE .)
    9th January 2007News article filed by BNP news team     ...
  • Irak, UK casualties . (11/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)
    7th January 2007News article filed by BNP defence correspondent     ...
  • Old artefact (11/01/2007 catégorie: HERITAGE HISTOIRE EUROPE)
    7th January 2007OLD ARTEFACT News article filed by BNP news team     ...
  • Squaddies in squalor (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
    31st December 2006 LES TROUFIONS BRITANNIQUES DANS LA MISERE News article filed by BNP news team     ...
  • Low-cost airlines aid migrants (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
    3rd January 2007News article filed by BNP news team     ...
  • Half Navy mothballed (11/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)
    2nd January 2007News article filed by BNP news team     ...
  • 1413 armagnacs , bourguignons . (11/01/2007 catégorie: HERITAGE HISTOIRE EUROPE)
      1413 ARMAGNACS BOURGUIGNONS http://grande-boucherie.chez-alice.fr/1413.htm     . ...
  • Lavage de cerveau scolaire pro-européen (11/01/2007 catégorie: POLITIQUE)
           EU BRAINWASHING IN SCHOOLS    lavage de cerveau pro-europe dans les écoles britanniques .     .http://www.yorkshiretoday.co.uk/ViewArticle2.aspx?SectionID=55&ArticleID=1953121THE EU has been accused of using underhand means in the classroom to try to 'brainwash' British ...
  • NHS compétition des "touristes de santé " contre les patients anglais (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
           HEALTH TOURISTS MAY DENY NHS PATIENTS KIDNEYS   http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2087-2534812,00.htmlHealth tourists are receiving free National Health Service kidney treatment worth about £30,000 a year, and potentially competing with British patients for scarce transplants, according ...
  • NHS Scandal 37, 000 jobs go (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
    BNP PUBLIC SERVICES BULLETIN w/c JANUARY 8, 2007           NHS SCANDAL AS 37,000 JOBS GOhttp://express.lineone.net/news_detail.html?sku=995LABOUR'S catastrophic mishandling of the NHS is laid bare in a secret Government memo predicting a crippling shortage of nurses, paltry payrises, posts ...
  • Indice Big Mac (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
    L’indice Big Mac est une mesure officieuse de la parité de pouvoir d'achat, inventée par le magazine The Economist en 1986. En admettant que les indices de pouvoir d'achat (ou du coût de la vie) convergent dans le temps, on peut prédire l'évolution du cours relatif des devises en comparant le prix d'un ...
  • E.U wants income tax (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
                           EU WANTS INCOME TAXAn even more audacious grab for our pay packets -- and don't imagine that the £510 per year quoted below is the end of it!http://express.lineone.net/news_detail.html?sku=973Brussels politicians ...
  • Further souring on Euro (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
                               EUROPEANS FURTHER SOURING ON EUROhttp://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2089-2524244,00.htmlNon, nein, no: Europe turns negative on the euro Matthew Campbell, ParisA French diplomat who ...
  • Immigration-unemployment link (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
                MORE SOPHISTRY ON IMMIGRATION-UNEMPLOYMENT LINKThis article is a fine case-study of a classic piece of immigrationist sophistry:  Immigration doesn't cause unemployment, therefore immigration is good for British workers.For a start, the premise is wrong.   Immigration ...
  • France consider tax cuts (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
    4. FRANCE CONSIDERS RADICAL TAX CUTS FOR CORPORATIONSFrance has long suffered economic stagnation, due in part to high taxes.  Britain used to have a tax advantage, over most of the rest of Europe, but Blair's tax increases have wiped this out.  The article below is a sure sign that the high-tax faith is growing stale even for its ...
  • Help for small business needed. (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
                    POLITICIANS MUST HELP SMALL BUSINESShttp://www.freelanceuk.com/news/2053.shtmlOne of Britain’s most vocal small business supporters has singled out top politicians to safeguard micro businesses from an imminent economic struggle.The Federation of Small ...
  • Slowing housing market in UK (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
                                 SLOWING HOUSING MARKET IN UKhttp://www.forbes.com/markets/2007/01/05/britain-housing-halifax-markets-econ-cx_po_0105markets14.htmlA scorching housing market has been fuelling ...
  • Xmas overspending bankrupting people in UK . (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
    BNP ECONOMICS BULLETIN w/c JANUARY 8, 2007     CHRISTMAS OVERSPENDING BANKRUPTING PEOPLEAnother sign of the rampant excesses of consumerism.http://www.forbes.com/markets/2007/01/05/britain-barclays-hsbc-markets-econ-cx_po_0105markets11.htmlThe British spent so much on presents and partying this past holiday season that ...
  • Saddam Hussein les RIPOUX de la pourriture diplomatique de la France pourrie . (07/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)
    Les ripoux de la diplomatie par Laurent Chabrun, Gilles Gaetner Un ex-ambassadeur de France à l'ONU,  un ex-secrétaire général du Quai d'Orsay, plusieurs hauts responsables des Nations unies... L'opération «Pétrole contre nourriture» a permis à de nombreuses personnalités ...
  • LES CORROMPUS SADDAMISTES (07/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)
    ...
  • LES CORROMPUS SADDAMISTES (07/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)
    ...
  • Les CORROMPUS par SADDAM HUSSEIN (07/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)
    La Saddam Connection   par Philippe Broussard Comment l'ex-dictateur irakien s'est assuré le soutien de personnalités pour détourner l'aide de l'ONU. Une enquête édifiante     ...
  • LES COURTISANS de Saddam Husssein , 5 (07/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)

 

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  •  
  • Health Service kidney treatment worth about £30,000 a year, and potentially competing with British patients for scarce transplants, according ...
  • NHS Scandal 37, 000 jobs go (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
    BNP PUBLIC
  • Indice Big relatif des devises en comparant le prix d'un ...
  • E.U wants income http://express.lineone.net/news_detail.html?sku=973Brussels politicians ...
  • Further souring on Euro (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
                               EUROPEANS FURTHER SOURING ON EUROhttp://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2089-2524244,00.htmlNon, nein, no: Europe turns negative on the euro Matthew Campbell, ParisA French diplomat who ...
  • Immigration-unemployment link (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
                MORE SOPHISTRY ON IMMIGRATION-UNEMPLOYMENT LINKThis article is a fine case-study of a classic piece of immigrationist sophistry:  Immigration doesn't cause unemployment, therefore immigration is good for British workers.For a start, the premise is wrong.   Immigration ...
  • France consider tax cuts (11/01/2007 catégorie: ECONOMIE)
    4. FRANCE CONSIDERS RADICAL TAX CUTS FOR CORPORATIONSFrance has long suffered economic stagnation, due in part to high taxes.  Britain used to have a tax advantage, over most of the rest of Europe, but Blair's tax increases have wiped this out.  The article below is a sure sign that the high-tax faith is growing stale even for its ...
  • Help for small
  • Slowing housing
  • rampant
  • de la
  • LES CORROMPUS SADDAMISTES (07/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)
    ...
  • Les CORROMPUS par
  • LES COURTISANS
  • suivante Page : 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 ...
Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10    

 

 

  • Jacques Chardonne (16/01/2007 catégorie: HERITAGE HISTOIRE EUROPE)
    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Chardonne   http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Chardonne   http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Chardonne http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Chardonne   * ...
  • Vidéo : course de cochons vs mosquée (15/01/2007 catégorie: RELIGIONS .MORALE .)
    Pig Race vs Mosque   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg_qctXR8jc# ...
  • Station de ski sans neige (15/01/2007 catégorie: ENVIRONNEMENT)
    Chômage dans les stations de ski... Publié le 15/01 à 11:20 ...
  • Roger NIMIER (15/01/2007 catégorie: HERITAGE HISTOIRE EUROPE)
      .. http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Nimier   http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Nimier http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Nimier * ...
  • Paul MORAND (15/01/2007 catégorie: HERITAGE HISTOIRE EUROPE)
      . http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Morand ...
  • Saddam : Jugement (11/01/2007 catégorie: WARS TERRORISTAN UNSECURITY)
    Mardi 09 Janvier 2007 blog drzz Par Guy Sorman, http://www.hebdo.ch/sormanblog.cfm La condamnation de Saddam Hussein par un tribunal arabe a été un événement historique considérable, un tournant peut-être, non pas seulement pour l’Irak mais dans le monde arabo-musulman.  Certes, ...
  • Europ , promised land for Africans (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
                  EUROPE THE 'PROMISED LAND' FOR AFRICANShttp://allafrica.com/stories/200701040880.htmlThe last summer has seen a surge in immigration to mainland Europe form some African countries. While European leaders are attempting to stop the wave, Tope Akinwande points to the hypocrisy ...
  • Europe " terre promise " pour africains (11/01/2007 catégorie: DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
          EUROPE THE 'PROMISED LAND' FOR AFRICANShttp://allafrica.com/stories/200701040880.htmlThe last summer has seen a surge in immigration to mainland Europe form some African countries. While European leaders are attempting to stop the wave, Tope Akinwande points to the hypocrisy of massive farm subsidies received ...
  • UK Gov't
  • : DEMOGRAPHIE ETHNIES)
  •       2007   First coachload of Bulgarians arrivehttp://www.lse.co.uk/ShowStory.asp?story=OM432660G&news_headline=first_coachload_of_bulgarians_arriveThe first bus-load of Bulgarians heading to Britain for work arrived in London this morning and spoke of their joy at being in the country.The 50 on board ...

 

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16 janvier 2007 2 16 /01 /janvier /2007 07:09
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15 janvier 2007 1 15 /01 /janvier /2007 21:00

Pig Race vs Mosque

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg_qctXR8jc#

This is a video response to Anti-mosque pigs race
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alertgoo (2 weeks ago)
Thanks for the news. I will spread on French blogs and various other contacts. This kind of short movies, giving news of all sorts of resistant action, is essential. Keep reporting.
(Reply)  
 
georgius6000 (1 week ago)
Tu peux garder ton clip merdqiue.
Don't go preaching your ignorant racist ideas in France. They have enough of their own !
(Reply)  
 
wackyruss (2 weeks ago)

Pig Race vs Mosque

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Views: 2,069
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alertgoo (2 weeks ago)
Thanks for the news. I will spread on French blogs and various other contacts. This kind of short movies, giving news of all sorts of resistant action, is essential. Keep reporting.
(Reply)  
 
georgius6000 (1 week ago)
Tu peux garder ton clip merdqiue.
Don't go preaching your ignorant racist ideas in France. They have enough of their own !

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f resistant action, is essential. Keep reporting.
(nto the neighborhood.
(
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GlobalDefenseGroup (1 week ago)

Pig Race vs Mosque

 
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15 janvier 2007 1 15 /01 /janvier /2007 20:56

Chômage dans les stations de ski...

Publié le 15/01 à 11:20
Dans les stations de moyenne altitude, les emplois saisonniers menacés par la pénurie de neige.
- France 3 -
Cliquez ici pour voir en grand
France 3
Villard-de-Lans et Correçon-en-Vercors, deux stations iséroises , se trouvent confrontées au manque de neige...

 

Sur le plateau du Vercors, Villard-de-Lans avait pourtant fait un bon début de saison avec une ouverture partielle de son domaine skiable pendant les vacances de fin d'année et 60 à 80 % de fréquentation. Mais en fin de semaine dernière, la station a été contrainte de fermer totalement ses pistes. Il ne fait pas assez froid pour faire fonctionner les 250 canons à neige de la station. Une décision qui a des conséquences sur l'emploi des saisonniers. Ainsi, l'embauche de 65 employés saisonniers prévue au 15 décembre avait été reportée au 15 janvier.

Si la neige n'arrive pas d'ici quatre semaines, ces personnes en chômage partiel seront inscrites au chômage économique.

 Mais à Villard-de-Lans, on veut garder espoir. Alors, en attendant le retour de l'or blanc, la station joue la carte de la pluri-activité.

 
  Info Rhône-Alpes Auvergne

 

Sur le plateau du Vercors, Villard-de-Lans avait pourtant fait un bon début de saison avec une ouverture partielle de son domaine skiable pendant les vacances de fin d'année et 60 à 80 % de fréquentation. Mais en fin de semaine dernière, la station a été contrainte de fermer totalement ses pistes. Il ne fait pas assez froid pour faire fonctionner les 250 canons à neige de la station. Une décision qui a des conséquences sur l'emploi des saisonniers. Ainsi, l'embauche de 65 employés saisonniers prévue au 15 décembre avait été reportée au 15 janvier. Si la neige n'arrive pas d'ici quatre semaines, ces personnes en chômage partiel seront inscrites au chômage économique. Mais à Villard-de-Lans, on veut garder espoir. Alors, en attendant le retour de l'or blanc, la station joue la carte de la pluri-activité.

La station de Corrençon est encore plus touchée par la pénurie de poudreuse. En effet, faute de neige, la station n'a pas encore ouvert son domaine alpin. La neige a cependant été précieusement entrenue sur certains secteurs afin de ne pas pénaliser les classes ...

- Villard-de-Lans - (Janvier 2007) - France 3 -
Cliquez ici pour voir en grand

Sur le plateau du Vercors, Villard-de-Lans avait pourtant fait un bon début de saison avec une ouverture partielle de son domaine skiable pendant les vacances de fin d'année et 60 à 80 % de fréquentation. Mais en fin de semaine dernière, la station a été contrainte de fermer totalement ses pistes. Il ne fait pas assez froid pour faire fonctionner les 250 canons à neige de la station. Une décision qui a des conséquences sur l'emploi des saisonniers. Ainsi, l'embauche de 65 employés saisonniers prévue au 15 décembre avait été reportée au 15 janvier. Si la neige n'arrive pas d'ici quatre semaines, ces personnes en chômage partiel seront inscrites au chômage économique. Mais à Villard-de-Lans, on veut garder espoir. Alors, en attendant le retour de l'or blanc, la station joue la carte de la pluri-activité.

La station de Corrençon est encore plus touchée par la pénurie de poudreuse. En effet, faute de neige, la station n'a pas encore ouvert son domaine alpin. La neige a cependant été précieusement entrenue sur certains secteurs afin de ne pas pénaliser les classes ...

- Villard-de-Lans - (Janvier 2007) - France 3 -
Cliquez ici pour voir en grand

Voir le reportage de F.Guais - G.L'Hôpitalier - F.Hubaud

Interviews
1 - Pierre-Henri Brunel, conducteur télécabine
2 - Claude Guillet; magasin articles sports
3 - Dominique Vassal; Directeur office tourisme

 Vercors - Chômage technique dans les stations (JT 19/20 le 12/01/2007)

Sur le plateau du Vercors, Villard-de-Lans avait pourtant fait un bon début de saison avec une ouverture partielle de son domaine skiable pendant les vacances de fin d'année et 60 à 80 % de fréquentation. Mais en fin de semaine dernière, la station a été contrainte de fermer totalement ses pistes. Il ne fait pas assez froid pour faire fonctionner les 250 canons à neige de la station. Une décision qui a des conséquences sur l'emploi des saisonniers. Ainsi, l'embauche de 65 employés saisonniers prévue au 15 décembre avait été reportée au 15 janvier. Si la neige n'arrive pas d'ici quatre semaines, ces personnes en chômage partiel seront inscrites au chômage économique. Mais à Villard-de-Lans, on veut garder espoir. Alors, en attendant le retour de l'or blanc, la station joue la carte de la pluri-activité.

La station de Corrençon est encore plus touchée par la pénurie de poudreuse. En effet, faute de neige, la station n'a pas encore ouvert son domaine alpin. La neige a cependant été précieusement entrenue sur certains secteurs afin de ne pas pénaliser les classes ...

- Villard-de-Lans - (Janvier 2007) - France 3 -
Cliquez ici pour voir en grand

Voir le reportage de F.Guais - G.L'Hôpitalier - F.Hubaud

Interviews
1 - Pierre-Henri Brunel, conducteur télécabine
2 - Claude Guillet; magasin articles sports
3 - Dominique Vassal; Directeur office tourisme

 Vercors - Chômage technique dans les stations (JT 19/20 le 12/01/2007)

 Vercors - Chômage technique dans les stations (JT 19/20 le 12/01/2007)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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15 janvier 2007 1 15 /01 /janvier /2007 20:55
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15 janvier 2007 1 15 /01 /janvier /2007 20:52

 

.PAUL MORAND

LES HUSSARDS 


http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Morand

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11 janvier 2007 4 11 /01 /janvier /2007 19:47
Mardi 09 Janvier 2007

blog drzz

Par Guy Sorman, http://www.hebdo.ch/sormanblog.cfm

La condamnation de Saddam Hussein par un tribunal arabe a été un événement historique considérable, un tournant peut-être, non pas seulement pour l’Irak mais dans le monde arabo-musulman.

 Certes, cette partie du monde est habitée par la violence et la fureur, et depuis des siècles, il est commun que les chefs d’Etat y soient passés par les armes. Mais c’est la première fois qu’une destitution a ici été imposée par le droit, selon des procédures juridiques incontestables.
Le tribunal de Bagdad a introduit, dans la civilisation arabo-musulmane, des notions juridiques qui ne doivent rien au Coran et à ses mille interprétations circonstancielles : le monde arabo-musulman est passé ainsi dans le camp des droits de l’homme, de l’universel : il a reconnu la notion de crimes contre l’humanité. Ce que Saddam Hussein ne pouvait pas comprendre ; sans doute, est-ce aussi trop tôt pour qu’une partie du monde arabe le comprenne.

Mais ce monde arabo-musulman,

grâce au procès, a quitté la tradition tribale fondée sur la race et la vengeance,

 pour rejoindre la norme d’une civilisation universelle et moderne. Le verdict a eu également le grand mérite de qualifier enfin clairement la dictature de Saddam Hussein et de bien d’autres de ses comparses dans la région :

 ce n’était pas un despotisme éclairé comme Saddam parvint bizarrement à en persuader certains en Occident ;

 ce n’était pas non plus un régime laïc contre l’obscurantisme islamiste.

 Le régime de Saddam était tout bonnement une dictature raciste, fondée sur le pouvoir exterminateur de sa tribu sunnite contre le chiites et les Kurdes.

 La qualification de crime contre l’humanité s’applique donc parfaitement à son cas, très proche de l’accusation de génocide qui aurait pu aussi être retenue.

Quels que soient les soubresauts qui accompagneront l’exécution de ce verdict, celui-ci renoue le fil de la modernisation arabo-musulmane qui avait été tranché dans les années 1950.

 Depuis le début du XIXe siècle – invasion de Napoléon en Egypte - jusqu’au milieu du XXe siècle, le monde arabo-musulman s’était engagé dans la voie de la modernisation à l’occidentale :

nul ne doutait en ce temps-là que l’islam et la démocratie ne soient compatibles. En Irak, Syrie, Egypte, Liban, les droits de l’homme, le progrès économique avancèrent ensemble pendant un siècle sans que l’identité musulmane ne soit mise à mal.

 C’est véritablement dans les années 1950, que l’influence soviétique, des coups d’Etat militaires, les affres de la décolonisation ont substitué, à la démocratie libérale, les passions nationalistes, racistes, tribales, puis islamistes.

L’aventure de Saddam Hussein s’expliquait mieux par l’histoire du XXe siècle que par la lecture du Coran.

Son procès ( et son exécution ), peut-être pas dans l’immédiat, mais dans la longue durée historique, ont refermé la parenthèse des idéologies totalitaires et réintroduit le monde arabo-musulman dans l’évolution vers l’état de droit. Ceci devrait satisfaire les centaines de millions de musulmans de par le monde qui pratiquent un islam modéré, aspirent à la démocratie et pas à la restauration fantasque du califat.

Mais , n’aurait-il pas fallu distinguer entre la condamnation à mort , souhaitable et légitime , et l’exécution pas forcément nécessaire ?

A voir : L'apogée et le déclin du dictateur le plus sanguinaire des temps modernes

L’exécution n’appelle-t-elle pas à la revanche ,amplifiant ainsi le cycle de la haine et du sang ? La mort de Saddam Hussein n’en fait-elle pas un martyre ? Toutes ces interrogations , légitimes , fondées, on se les pose en Europe ; les adversaires de la peine de mort enragent mais leur colère est-elle ici juste et pure ? Est-ce le moment et le lieu pour s’opposer à la peine de mort en toutes circonstances ? Et , surtout , les Irakiens , qu’en pensent-ils ?

Personnellement , j’avais suggéré après la condamnation de Saddam Hussein , une peine autre que la mort ; par exemple , m’inspirant de l’obligation faite en Allemagne en 1945 à des officiers nazis , contraindre Saddam Hussein à déterrer ses victimes des fosses communes pour leur donner une sépulture décente .

Les Irakiens en ont décidé autrement : en fin de compte , ce sont eux les victimes et eux , je pense , qui savent mieux que nous ce qu’il fallait faire ou ne pas faire, dans la culture et dans la situation qui est la leur . Nous ne sommes , loin de l’Irak, pas les mieux placés pour les conseiller.Les juges de Saddam Hussein ont dû décider , en leur conscience , je le suppose, de le pendre plutôt que la clémence . Ils ont dû envisager que Saddam Hussein, par sa mort , peut-être , pour la première fois de sa carrière , va rendre effectivement service à son peuple.

 

 

 

 

D'autres articles sur le même sujet : les chroniques de Guy Sorman

 


 

 

 

 

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11 janvier 2007 4 11 /01 /janvier /2007 19:45

              EUROPE THE 'PROMISED LAND' FOR AFRICANS

http://allafrica.com/stories/200701040880.html

The last summer has seen a surge in immigration to mainland
Europe form some African countries. While European leaders are
attempting to stop the wave, Tope Akinwande points to the hypocrisy
of massive farm subsidies received by European farmers and the
trade policies that make it impossible for African agriculture
sectors to survive.

Like their other fellow members of the human race, Africans have
migrated since the dawn of history. They have moved in response
to demographic, economic, political and related factors [1]. In
recent times, there has been a spotlight on African immigration
to European countries. As the legal requirements for entry into
Europe become stricter and more cumbersome and as opportunities
of a decent livelihood shrinks in sub-Saharan Africa, its people
have resorted to desperate means in order to gain access to what
is generally considered to be the ‘Promised Land’ for many
Africans outside Europe. This has been ever more apparent in west
Africa, where young people travel through deserts, stow away in
ships, and employ all sorts of means in order to reach Europe.

How did this situation arise? In the 1960s and the beginning of
the 1970s, Africa's future looked bright. It was the
post-independence ‘self-determination’ era laden with all sorts of
opportunities; almost all of the agricultural-based African economies
could meet the needs of its people. An average African had no
cause to risk their life by travelling in a desperate fashion to
Europe when their basic needs could be met in their country of
origin.

Africans who ventured to Europe for further studies were in a
hurry to return to their countries of origin as prestigious and
lucrative jobs with all the accompanying benefits awaited them.
Afterwards, they only travelled to the western world for business
and leisure. The few African students who stayed back in Europe
were considered as failures who could not find their feet back
home.

However, things have taken a dramatic turn for the worse.
Africans and especially west Africans - probably because of the
coastal closeness to Europe - are the new ‘Boat People’ fleeing abject
poverty occasioned by lack of opportunities in their countries
of origin. They are constantly in the international spotlight
either being rescued by European coast guards, attended to by
tourists or having their bloated bodies occasionally washed to the
shores.

In the summer of 2006 - summer is said to be the preferred
travel time as the sea is supposedly calmer - it was almost a daily
occurrence to see demeaning images of tired and
hopelessly-looking African men and women rescued by European coast guards after
risking their lives to get to the Spanish Canary Islands. They
used make-shift boats to negotiate the treacherous waves of the
Mediterranean Sea with the aim of escaping poverty back home [2].

According to the International Organisation for Migration (IOM),
and the United Nations Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs,
over 27,000 illegal immigrants have turned up in 2006 on the
Spanish Canary Island off the west African coast.

While the rescued sojourners are considered to be ‘fortunate’ to
have stepped onto the shores of Europe despite the excruciating
difficulties awaiting them, many Africans are not lucky enough
to be intercepted mid-sea by coast guards. They perish with their
desperate dreams. So far in 2006, the Spanish coast guard has
accounted for 500 bodies found in the ocean around the Canaries.

Origin of the problem

Compared to the 1960s and early 1970s, Africa's growth
performance in the 80s and 90s has been very bad. The 1980s have been
described as a ‘lost decade’ [3], while the children of that era
and the 1990s have been famously tagged the ‘wasted generation’ by
the Nigerian Nobel Laureate, Wole Soyinka.

Despite the strong belief held by many Africa analysts that the
economic woes of Africa are rooted in its ‘largely documented
history’ of colonialism which culminated in a façade called
‘independence’ and the Cold War which institutionalised despotism,
kleptocracy, and big-man politics, the Structural Adjustment
Programmes (SAP) imposed by the World Bank and International Monetary
Fund (IMF), have made it impossible for African countries to
meet the basic needs of their people.

Introduced in the 1970s to galvanise the economies of African
countries, following the decline in the prices of agricultural
products, SAP came with tough conditionalities such as
privatisation, wage freezes, privatisation, elimination of price controls
and lifting of trade barriers.

Instead of encouraging economic development, SAPs created a new
phenomenon of Heavily Indebted Poor Countries who could not meet
the basic needs of their people.

In its 22 June 2006 edition, The Economist in its characteristic
sanctimonious manner posited that ‘rich countries have been
generous lately, with extra aid and debt relief, giving many
struggling economies a breath of air. By the end of last year, 29
countries, 25 of them in Africa, had had their debt burden eased...’
The magazine goes on to wonder if ‘...Africa, often dubbed the
hopeless continent, (is) finally taking off?’ [4] For once, a
magazine that has carelessly dubbed Africa as a ‘Hopeless
Continent’ conceded that ‘Africa itself deserves the credit for the
upswing ‘of its economy in the past year’ [5].

Like most of its counterparts in the international media, what
‘The Economist’ failed to acknowledge is that the dividends of
the so-called debt relief are easily drowned by one phenomenon -
the international trade policies of the ‘generous’ industrial
nations it was talking about. The debt relief issue is like giving
something out with the left hand and taking it back with the
right hand.

In March 2005, the British government, who has been in the
forefront of the Highly Indebted Poor Countries Initiative (HIPCI),
published a detailed report of the £1.7bn it gave to
agricultural companies as subsidies. At the same time, the US -though
planning to reduce its subsidies to American farmers by 5 percent -
gave about $9bn [6].

How on earth would African farmers compete with their European
and American counterparts on the world food market? Would African
governments whose national budgets are sometimes smaller than
the subsidies western farmers receive be able to subsidise their
farmers to ‘even the scores’? They will have to face incessant
unrest at home while the rest of their citizens ‘hit the road’ or
set off for European coasts.

Oumar Hamadoun Dicko, Foreign Affairs Minister of Mali, could
not have been more precise on the causes of the recent wave of
immigration of west Africans: ‘Immigration is going to continue
unless we address fundamental issues like the unequal terms of
trade,’ he says. ‘African farmers can't compete and are out of world
markets,’ he concludes in a recent interview with United Nations
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs [7]. He
surely knows what he is talking about since Mali's cotton farmers
have been greatly affected by the subsidies enjoyed by their
western counterparts.

According to the Malian Foreign Affairs Ministry, 4 million, or
over a third of Mali's 11.7 million people are currently out of
the country [8]. It is noteworthy that the majority of these
Malian emigrants are from Kayes, the main cotton-producing area of
the country. They have had to leave their cotton farms to try
their luck in Europe.

Monies remitted by this large Malian Diaspora have been vital in
meeting the needs that the government has been unable to meet.
Many Malians in the Diaspora are building schools, dispensaries,
and other amenities in their regions. The Malian Ministry of
Foreign Affairs concedes that annual Malian Diaspora remittance
exceeds 200 million US Dollars, which is more than half of the
country's export earnings.

While a lot of talks have been going on about agricultural
subsidies as the main international trade policies that have hampered
trade and development in Africa, it is interesting to know that
there are many other types of subsidies such as ‘fishing
subsidies’ that have not made life easier for developing countries.

Recently, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) accused Japan of
paying the highest subsidies to its national fishing industry at
$US2-billion dollars. The report also indicated that the
15-member European Union, China, and the United States are leading
underwriters [9]. These governments give their farmers and fishing
companies subsidies in the form of grants, loans and loan
guarantees, equity infusions, tax preferences, and price or income
support.

Thiaroye-Sur-Mer is a fishing town a few kilometres from Dakar,
the capital of Senegal. A few years ago and up till the end of
2005, one could see hundreds of fishermen - both young and old -
selling fish to locals and large-scale buyers from Dakar and
elsewhere. Today, Thiaroye-Sur-Mer has almost become a ghost town
as almost all the younger fishermen have all taken to the seas;
this time not to fish but to try their luck in Spain's Canary
Islands. They sold their means of livelihood (boats, fishing nets,
etc) and bought a one-way ticket on a boat to a supposed better
future in Europe.

Like many sub-Saharan African countries, Senegal has been going
through an excruciating SAP that has completely destroyed its
economy. Its main source of income - groundnut - is no longer
well-priced on the international market as many substitutes have
been derived. Senegal's fishing industry is losing its momentum as
the country has been inundated with subsidised food, including
fish from Europe and Asia, making it impossible for local
fishermen to sell their wares at a decent rate and meet the basic needs
of their families. The only way for these young Senegalese
fishermen to survive and meet the needs of their families is by
trying their luck in Europe. This has become a way of life in a
country where monies remitted by the Senegalese Diaspora sometimes
accounts for 90 percent of income in many households.

Which way forward?

With the recent wave of immigration to the Spanish Canary
Island, European governments, led by Spain, have been trying to curb
the immigration of Africans who are willing to risk their lives
to reach Europe at all costs.

The incidents of September and October 2005 where Spanish coast
guards opened fire on ill-equipped boats full of African
immigrants led to the adoption of the ‘Rabat Declaration’ on 11 July
2006 by 57 European and African countries. The Declaration
enjoined the 57 signatory countries to set up an action plan that will
get to the core of the problem.

In September 2006, the European Union promised to provide Mali
with US$542 million over five years to control the emigration of
its citizens. Mali is expected to use the money to start various
projects aimed at discouraging young people from emigrating.

International NGOs are also trying to encourage young Africans
to stay back in their countries. For example, the Spanish Red
Cross has embarked on an awareness campaign in Senegal to demystify
the notion of success attached to emigration. They are
emphasizing the harsh realities.

African celebrities have also thrown themselves into the fray.
One of the most successful African singers, Senegalese Youssou
N'Dour is lending his notoriety and voice to the anti-emigration
campaign. In collaboration with IOM and other well-known
Senegalese musicians, he has recorded a single titled ‘Emigration’ where
he enjoined the youth not to abandon their country. One thing
missing in this beautiful and groovy record is that Youssou N'Dour
forgot to suggest alternatives to Senegalese and African youth.

Can these initiatives work? Since all the aforementioned
initiatives, there have been cases of African boat people arriving in
Spain and as recent as September 2006 in Malta, thus exasperating
the government of the tiny country that has just joined the
European Union.

As one route is being blocked, Africans perfect their
‘travelling techniques’. On 20 November 2006 Europa Press Agency reported
how 1,293 west Africans, braving a very harsh winter, arrived in
Spain' s Canary island with many of them using well-built
fishing vessels. They also travelled with enough provisions (food,
winter clothing, etc. ) to see them through their journey of death.
Interestingly, some immigrants devise or go back to the old
routes, probably thinking that immigration authorities' would have
shifted focus away from them.

Conclusion

As I had indicated earlier on, there are a lot of initiatives to
curb illegal immigration with the latest one being the first
Ministerial Conference on Migration and Development between EU and
the entire African continent slated for 22 and 23 November 2006.
One of the expected outcomes of the Conference was the
establishment of a framework for a joint collaboration between Europe and
Africa to curb illegal immigration. The framework will consider
major causes of immigration such as economic integration and
development.

When one considers the impact of the remittances made by African
immigrants - both legal and illegal - to their national
economies and how it is being sadly flaunted and praised as an
alternative to foreign earnings, it is not foolhardy to wonder if African
politicians are really sincere and keen on curbing the flow of
their citizens to the west. Why should they bother when the
emigration of their citizens ‘relieves’ them of the headache of
sourcing funds to embark on development projects such as building of
schools, hospitals, roads, etc. ? If they genuinely work towards
stopping them from emigrating, what alternatives do they have
for farmers who cannot sell their produce? Have they got any
alternatives for young graduates and school leavers they are churned
out in millions into joblessness and despair?

It is noteworthy that while African politicians are silently
grateful for the ‘subsidies’ they get from their citizens in the
Diaspora, western politicians are not keen on stopping the
subsidies they give to their citizens as their national interest and
particularly political survival in their respective countries
depends on keeping their farmers and citizens happy.

As long as this political deadlock is not broken, the west and
Europe in particular, should be prepared to receive more and more
people.

• Tope Akinwande is a Desk Officer at the West Africa Department
of TEARFUND, a leading UK relief and development NGO working in
partnership with Christian agencies and churches in over 70
countries to tackle the causes and effects of poverty. His views do
not necessarily reflect those of TEARFUND.

• Please send comments to
editor@pambazuka.org or comment at
http://www.pambazuka.org

*********





Repost 0
Published by Le comte vert - dans HOME ACCUEIL
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11 janvier 2007 4 11 /01 /janvier /2007 19:45

      EUROPE THE 'PROMISED LAND' FOR AFRICANS

http://allafrica.com/stories/200701040880.html

The last summer has seen a surge in immigration to mainland
Europe form some African countries. While European leaders are
attempting to stop the wave, Tope Akinwande points to the hypocrisy
of massive farm subsidies received by European farmers and the
trade policies that make it impossible for African agriculture
sectors to survive.

Like their other fellow members of the human race, Africans have
migrated since the dawn of history. They have moved in response
to demographic, economic, political and related factors [1]. In
recent times, there has been a spotlight on African immigration
to European countries. As the legal requirements for entry into
Europe become stricter and more cumbersome and as opportunities
of a decent livelihood shrinks in sub-Saharan Africa, its people
have resorted to desperate means in order to gain access to what
is generally considered to be the ‘Promised Land’ for many
Africans outside Europe. This has been ever more apparent in west
Africa, where young people travel through deserts, stow away in
ships, and employ all sorts of means in order to reach Europe.

How did this situation arise? In the 1960s and the beginning of
the 1970s, Africa's future looked bright. It was the
post-independence ‘self-determination’ era laden with all sorts of
opportunities; almost all of the agricultural-based African economies
could meet the needs of its people. An average African had no
cause to risk their life by travelling in a desperate fashion to
Europe when their basic needs could be met in their country of
origin.

Africans who ventured to Europe for further studies were in a
hurry to return to their countries of origin as prestigious and
lucrative jobs with all the accompanying benefits awaited them.
Afterwards, they only travelled to the western world for business
and leisure. The few African students who stayed back in Europe
were considered as failures who could not find their feet back
home.

However, things have taken a dramatic turn for the worse.
Africans and especially west Africans - probably because of the
coastal closeness to Europe - are the new ‘Boat People’ fleeing abject
poverty occasioned by lack of opportunities in their countries
of origin. They are constantly in the international spotlight
either being rescued by European coast guards, attended to by
tourists or having their bloated bodies occasionally washed to the
shores.

In the summer of 2006 - summer is said to be the preferred
travel time as the sea is supposedly calmer - it was almost a daily
occurrence to see demeaning images of tired and
hopelessly-looking African men and women rescued by European coast guards after
risking their lives to get to the Spanish Canary Islands. They
used make-shift boats to negotiate the treacherous waves of the
Mediterranean Sea with the aim of escaping poverty back home [2].

According to the International Organisation for Migration (IOM),
and the United Nations Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs,
over 27,000 illegal immigrants have turned up in 2006 on the
Spanish Canary Island off the west African coast.

While the rescued sojourners are considered to be ‘fortunate’ to
have stepped onto the shores of Europe despite the excruciating
difficulties awaiting them, many Africans are not lucky enough
to be intercepted mid-sea by coast guards. They perish with their
desperate dreams. So far in 2006, the Spanish coast guard has
accounted for 500 bodies found in the ocean around the Canaries.

Origin of the problem

Compared to the 1960s and early 1970s, Africa's growth
performance in the 80s and 90s has been very bad. The 1980s have been
described as a ‘lost decade’ [3], while the children of that era
and the 1990s have been famously tagged the ‘wasted generation’ by
the Nigerian Nobel Laureate, Wole Soyinka.

Despite the strong belief held by many Africa analysts that the
economic woes of Africa are rooted in its ‘largely documented
history’ of colonialism which culminated in a façade called
‘independence’ and the Cold War which institutionalised despotism,
kleptocracy, and big-man politics, the Structural Adjustment
Programmes (SAP) imposed by the World Bank and International Monetary
Fund (IMF), have made it impossible for African countries to
meet the basic needs of their people.

Introduced in the 1970s to galvanise the economies of African
countries, following the decline in the prices of agricultural
products, SAP came with tough conditionalities such as
privatisation, wage freezes, privatisation, elimination of price controls
and lifting of trade barriers.

Instead of encouraging economic development, SAPs created a new
phenomenon of Heavily Indebted Poor Countries who could not meet
the basic needs of their people.

In its 22 June 2006 edition, The Economist in its characteristic
sanctimonious manner posited that ‘rich countries have been
generous lately, with extra aid and debt relief, giving many
struggling economies a breath of air. By the end of last year, 29
countries, 25 of them in Africa, had had their debt burden eased...’
The magazine goes on to wonder if ‘...Africa, often dubbed the
hopeless continent, (is) finally taking off?’ [4] For once, a
magazine that has carelessly dubbed Africa as a ‘Hopeless
Continent’ conceded that ‘Africa itself deserves the credit for the
upswing ‘of its economy in the past year’ [5].

Like most of its counterparts in the international media, what
‘The Economist’ failed to acknowledge is that the dividends of
the so-called debt relief are easily drowned by one phenomenon -
the international trade policies of the ‘generous’ industrial
nations it was talking about. The debt relief issue is like giving
something out with the left hand and taking it back with the
right hand.

In March 2005, the British government, who has been in the
forefront of the Highly Indebted Poor Countries Initiative (HIPCI),
published a detailed report of the £1.7bn it gave to
agricultural companies as subsidies. At the same time, the US -though
planning to reduce its subsidies to American farmers by 5 percent -
gave about $9bn [6].

How on earth would African farmers compete with their European
and American counterparts on the world food market? Would African
governments whose national budgets are sometimes smaller than
the subsidies western farmers receive be able to subsidise their
farmers to ‘even the scores’? They will have to face incessant
unrest at home while the rest of their citizens ‘hit the road’ or
set off for European coasts.

Oumar Hamadoun Dicko, Foreign Affairs Minister of Mali, could
not have been more precise on the causes of the recent wave of
immigration of west Africans: ‘Immigration is going to continue
unless we address fundamental issues like the unequal terms of
trade,’ he says. ‘African farmers can't compete and are out of world
markets,’ he concludes in a recent interview with United Nations
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs [7]. He
surely knows what he is talking about since Mali's cotton farmers
have been greatly affected by the subsidies enjoyed by their
western counterparts.

According to the Malian Foreign Affairs Ministry, 4 million, or
over a third of Mali's 11.7 million people are currently out of
the country [8]. It is noteworthy that the majority of these
Malian emigrants are from Kayes, the main cotton-producing area of
the country. They have had to leave their cotton farms to try
their luck in Europe.

Monies remitted by this large Malian Diaspora have been vital in
meeting the needs that the government has been unable to meet.
Many Malians in the Diaspora are building schools, dispensaries,
and other amenities in their regions. The Malian Ministry of
Foreign Affairs concedes that annual Malian Diaspora remittance
exceeds 200 million US Dollars, which is more than half of the
country's export earnings.

While a lot of talks have been going on about agricultural
subsidies as the main international trade policies that have hampered
trade and development in Africa, it is interesting to know that
there are many other types of subsidies such as ‘fishing
subsidies’ that have not made life easier for developing countries.

Recently, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) accused Japan of
paying the highest subsidies to its national fishing industry at
$US2-billion dollars. The report also indicated that the
15-member European Union, China, and the United States are leading
underwriters [9]. These governments give their farmers and fishing
companies subsidies in the form of grants, loans and loan
guarantees, equity infusions, tax preferences, and price or income
support.

Thiaroye-Sur-Mer is a fishing town a few kilometres from Dakar,
the capital of Senegal. A few years ago and up till the end of
2005, one could see hundreds of fishermen - both young and old -
selling fish to locals and large-scale buyers from Dakar and
elsewhere. Today, Thiaroye-Sur-Mer has almost become a ghost town
as almost all the younger fishermen have all taken to the seas;
this time not to fish but to try their luck in Spain's Canary
Islands. They sold their means of livelihood (boats, fishing nets,
etc) and bought a one-way ticket on a boat to a supposed better
future in Europe.

Like many sub-Saharan African countries, Senegal has been going
through an excruciating SAP that has completely destroyed its
economy. Its main source of income - groundnut - is no longer
well-priced on the international market as many substitutes have
been derived. Senegal's fishing industry is losing its momentum as
the country has been inundated with subsidised food, including
fish from Europe and Asia, making it impossible for local
fishermen to sell their wares at a decent rate and meet the basic needs
of their families. The only way for these young Senegalese
fishermen to survive and meet the needs of their families is by
trying their luck in Europe. This has become a way of life in a
country where monies remitted by the Senegalese Diaspora sometimes
accounts for 90 percent of income in many households.

Which way forward?

With the recent wave of immigration to the Spanish Canary
Island, European governments, led by Spain, have been trying to curb
the immigration of Africans who are willing to risk their lives
to reach Europe at all costs.

The incidents of September and October 2005 where Spanish coast
guards opened fire on ill-equipped boats full of African
immigrants led to the adoption of the ‘Rabat Declaration’ on 11 July
2006 by 57 European and African countries. The Declaration
enjoined the 57 signatory countries to set up an action plan that will
get to the core of the problem.

In September 2006, the European Union promised to provide Mali
with US$542 million over five years to control the emigration of
its citizens. Mali is expected to use the money to start various
projects aimed at discouraging young people from emigrating.

International NGOs are also trying to encourage young Africans
to stay back in their countries. For example, the Spanish Red
Cross has embarked on an awareness campaign in Senegal to demystify
the notion of success attached to emigration. They are
emphasizing the harsh realities.

African celebrities have also thrown themselves into the fray.
One of the most successful African singers, Senegalese Youssou
N'Dour is lending his notoriety and voice to the anti-emigration
campaign. In collaboration with IOM and other well-known
Senegalese musicians, he has recorded a single titled ‘Emigration’ where
he enjoined the youth not to abandon their country. One thing
missing in this beautiful and groovy record is that Youssou N'Dour
forgot to suggest alternatives to Senegalese and African youth.

Can these initiatives work? Since all the aforementioned
initiatives, there have been cases of African boat people arriving in
Spain and as recent as September 2006 in Malta, thus exasperating
the government of the tiny country that has just joined the
European Union.

As one route is being blocked, Africans perfect their
‘travelling techniques’. On 20 November 2006 Europa Press Agency reported
how 1,293 west Africans, braving a very harsh winter, arrived in
Spain' s Canary island with many of them using well-built
fishing vessels. They also travelled with enough provisions (food,
winter clothing, etc. ) to see them through their journey of death.
Interestingly, some immigrants devise or go back to the old routes, probably thinking that immigration authorities' would have
shifted focus away from them.

Conclusion

As I had indicated earlier on, there are a lot of initiatives to
curb illegal immigration with the latest one being the first
Ministerial Conference on Migration and Development between EU and
the entire African continent slated for 22 and 23 November 2006.
One of the expected outcomes of the Conference was the
establishment of a framework for a joint collaboration between Europe and
Africa to curb illegal immigration. The framework will consider
major causes of immigration such as economic integration and
development.

When one considers the impact of the remittances made by African
immigrants - both legal and illegal - to their national
economies and how it is being sadly flaunted and praised as an
alternative to foreign earnings, it is not foolhardy to wonder if African
politicians are really sincere and keen on curbing the flow of
their citizens to the west. Why should they bother when the
emigration of their citizens ‘relieves’ them of the headache of
sourcing funds to embark on development projects such as building of
schools, hospitals, roads, etc. ? If they genuinely work towards
stopping them from emigrating, what alternatives do they have
for farmers who cannot sell their produce? Have they got any
alternatives for young graduates and school leavers they are churned
out in millions into joblessness and despair?

It is noteworthy that while African politicians are silently
grateful for the ‘subsidies’ they get from their citizens in the
Diaspora, western politicians are not keen on stopping the
subsidies they give to their citizens as their national interest and
particularly political survival in their respective countries
depends on keeping their farmers and citizens happy.

As long as this political deadlock is not broken, the west and
Europe in particular, should be prepared to receive more and more
people.

• Tope Akinwande is a Desk Officer at the West Africa Department
of TEARFUND, a leading UK relief and development NGO working in
partnership with Christian agencies and churches in over 70
countries to tackle the causes and effects of poverty. His views do
not necessarily reflect those of TEARFUND.

• Please send comments to
editor@pambazuka.org or comment at
http://www.pambazuka.org

*



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11 janvier 2007 4 11 /01 /janvier /2007 19:44

      GOV'T LETS SMUGGLED ALIENS STAY IN BRITAIN

 le GOUVERNEMENT BRITANNIQUE LAISSE LES CLANDESTINS

ILLEGAUX RESTER DANS LE PAYS .

http://www.yorkshiretoday.co.uk/ViewArticle2.aspx?SectionID=55&ArticleID=1955424

The Government must sign a European Convention which grants
victims of human trafficking the right to stay in Britain
temporarily,

the Conservative Party has said.

Shadow home secretary David Davis said the move was vital for
‘moral reasons’ to protect people exploited by trafficking gangs.
Despite his party's previous opposition to signing the European
Convention on Action Against Trafficking in Human Beings, Mr
Davis said he was confident it would not attract more immigrants to
Britain.

The Government has so far refused to join the agreement, which
grants victims of human trafficking at least 30 days to recover
from their ordeal and reflect on whether they will help police.

Mr Davis said: ‘There is something the Government should do
tomorrow and that is sign the European Convention against
trafficking.

‘The Government has avoided doing this – I don't really
understand why.

‘I do not believe that by giving civilised treatment to the
victims of this trade – allowing 30 days' reflection whilst they are
ready to go and become witnesses – that that will actually be a
pull factor. Just the reverse.’

Mr Davis said other measures which should be taken immediately
include setting up a helpline for victims and increasing the
number of safe houses for people rescued from trafficking,.

He also repeated the Tories' intention to create a new border
police force to reduce the number of people entering the UK
illegally.
He said: ‘It is now 200 years since William Wilberforce saw the
end of the slave trade in the UK. It is past time that we
brought this evil trade to an end. ‘It is a high priority for a moral
reason.’

He said the problem of trafficking involved thousands of people
brought to the UK under false pretences to work in the sex trade
or for gangmasters and other exploitative employers.

According to estimates there were 4,000 victims of trafficking
in prostitution in the UK during 2003. Another estimate put the
figure at 10,000 in London and the Midlands alone, he added.

However, there have been only 30 convictions for trafficking
from 2004 to last year. Immigration minister Liam Byrne said: ‘The
UK fully supports the multiple aims of the convention and
participated actively in the negotiations.

‘The Home Secretary is at present giving the matter his fullest
consideration and will be writing to colleagues in Government in
the near future.

There are no time limits within which signature
must take place.’
Tim Hancock, of Amnesty International, said: ‘We hope the
Government will be minded to sign up to the European Convention
Against Trafficking without delay.’

.

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