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24 septembre 2007 1 24 /09 /septembre /2007 07:55

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Auteur italien ( décédé)

Un séjour au camp d'AUSCHWITZ

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24 septembre 2007 1 24 /09 /septembre /2007 07:43

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PATRIMOINE FRANCAIS

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  http://decadence-europa.over-blog.com

 

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24 septembre 2007 1 24 /09 /septembre /2007 07:36

 

Statue at Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square - Panorama

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24 septembre 2007 1 24 /09 /septembre /2007 07:33

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23 septembre 2007 7 23 /09 /septembre /2007 18:47

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Image:George IV coronation banquet.jpg

 

 

 

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23 septembre 2007 7 23 /09 /septembre /2007 18:44

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Image:Sir Henry Havelock Statue Trafalgar Square 2006-04-17.jpg

STATUE

TRAFALGAR SQUARE 

 

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Henry_Havelock

 

 

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23 septembre 2007 7 23 /09 /septembre /2007 18:35

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23 septembre 2007 7 23 /09 /septembre /2007 18:23

21st September 2007

 
 
 
London Mayor Ken Livingstone has suggested that a statue to Indian rebel leader Mahatma Gandi should be erected in Parliament Square alongside that of mass murderer and terrorist Nelson Mandela.
The self confessed pro-Islamist was present at the unveiling of the Mandela statue last month.

Mr Livingstone said: "If you're looking for people who represent a major part of our history, which South Africa is, or you think of India, I wonder whether or not we shouldn't be looking at having a statue of Mahatma Gandi, who perhaps had a bigger significance on the British Empire than anyone else, because two thirds of it got independent overnight.

"You get millions of people from all over the world who come to see Big Ben and see the statue of Churchill and so on, and here's someone they would understand.”


But there is some truth in Livingstone’s comments about the ignorance of British history.

"In a thousand years they'll still know who Mahatma Gandhi was, whereas if you wander round Trafalgar Square, the two generals there, you have to go and check the history books."

So very true, our youngsters are no longer taught about our national heroes and heroines; our inventors and engineers, our explorers and geniuses of scientific breakthrough, our military leaders and builders of Empire.
 
 Instead history classes are replete with lessons about “interpretations of slavery”, “Native American”, “the American civil rights movement”

One thing is for certain – Red Ken will have no statues to remember his acts of treachery to the people of Britain.

Imperial heroes

For the record the three bronze statues in Trafalgar Square are in memory of three heroes of Empire.

In the southwest corner :
 General Sir Charles James Napier – Imperial hero.
 
 
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 He saw military service from the age of 12. By the time of 18 he was a lieutenant in the 95th Manningham's Rifles; a new corps which was designed to supply a body of light troops for the English army fit to cope with the French infantry.
 
 
He was involved in action in the Cape (1806), Spain (1808).
 
As a volunteer he served in the actions in the Peninsular War on the Coa, and again at Busaco, where he was badly wounded in the face.
 
He was ordered to England, but refused to go, and in March 1811, though barely recovered, he hurried to the front to take part in the pursuit of the French Marshal André Massena.
He was sent to Cephalonia, in 1822 where he remained for eight years as governor and military resident.
 
 
He was the model of an absolute colonial governor, and showed all the qualities of a benevolent dictator. He made good roads and founded great institutions, feared no man including his seniors.
 
His time in India sealed his fame.
 
His men were ever ready and loyal.
 
 With just 2800 men he succeeded in winning the brilliant and decisive victory of Meeanee, one of the most amazing in the history of the British army, in which generals had to fight like privates, and Sir Charles himself engaged in the fray.

The bronze statue was erected by public subscription, by far the greater number of the subscribers being, as the inscription records, private soldiers.

Southeast plinth:
 Major General Sir Henry Havelock.
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Image:Sir Henry Havelock Statue Trafalgar Square 2006-04-17.jpg
 
 He was the son of a wealthy Wearside shipbuilder and one of four brothers all of whom entered the Army.
 
 He bought a commission in 1815 at the age of 20 but having no prospects of active service he departed for India in 1823.
 
He was a great scholar having studied all the military books available at the time and self taught a command of Persian, Hindi and Urdu.
 
Havelock served with distinction in the First Anglo-Burmese War (1824-1826).
 
 He became a Baptist on his return to England and he introduced some of his new family's missionary ideas to the army and began the distribution of bibles to all soldiers.
 
He also introduced all-rank bible study classes and established the first non-church services for military personnel.
His years of study of the theories of war and his experiences in earlier campaigns were put to good use during the Indian Mutiny where Havelock proved himself the man for the occasion and won a reputation as a great military leader.
 

Three times he advanced for the relief of the Siege of Lucknow, but twice held back rather than risk fighting with troops wasted by battle and disease. Reinforcements arrived at last under Outram, and he was able to capture Lucknow on the 25th of September 1857.
 
However, a second rebel force arrived and besieged the town again.
 
This time Havelock and his troops were caught inside the blockade.
 

There he died on the November 29, 1857 of dysentery, a few days after the siege was lifted.
 
The illness was likely brought on by the anxieties and fatigue connected with his victorious march and with the subsequent blockade of the British troops.
 
 He lived long enough to receive news that he was to be created a Baronet for the first three battles of the campaign; but he never knew of the major-generalship which was conferred shortly afterwards.

Northeast corner:
 
King George IV on horseback.
 
 
Not the most influential or popular of monarchs who led an extravagant lifestyle which on occasion plunged him into debt. He was a flamboyant party goer but he took an active interest in matters of style and taste, and his associates such as the dandy
 
 Beau Brummell and the
 
architect John Nash created the Regency style.
In London Nash designed the Regency terraces of Regent's Park and Regent Street.
 
George took up the new idea of the seaside spa and had the Brighton Pavilion developed as a fantastical seaside palace.
 
The Duke of Wellington described him as such:
 
 "He was the most extraordinary compound of talent, wit, buffoonery, obstinacy, and good feelings, in short, a medley of the most opposite qualities, with a great preponderance of good - that I ever saw in any character in my life."

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Trafalgar Square - Panorama

 

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23 septembre 2007 7 23 /09 /septembre /2007 18:18

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23 septembre 2007 7 23 /09 /septembre /2007 18:13

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 CLIMATE CHANGING!

photo pourtant hivernale !!

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